Kentucky Edition 22 : Page 11

Defining the Future of Advanced Practice Nursing: The APRN CoNseNsus Model By Suzette Scheuermann, Phd, rN, Nursing Practice and research Consultant, and Charlotte Beason, Edd, rN, NEA, Executive director Exciting new regulations for ARNP practice and education are being implemented in Kentucky. In December of 2008, the Kentucky Board of Nursing approved the recommendations to pursue legislation for implementation of the Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) Model Consensus. This national model that is endorsed by more than 40 regulatory, certifying, professional and accrediting agencies establishes uniform recommendations for licensure, accreditation, certification, and education of APRNs. An overview of the Consensus Model appears below: ARNP Title Change to APRN Legislation to implement the Consensus Model for APRN Regulation: Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, and Education by the Kentucky Board of Nursing is underway. One of the first changes pursued by the KBN will be to revise the title of the Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner (ARNP) to Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN). This title will be legally protected and used only by individuals licensed as an APRN. Overview of the APRN Model The APRN Model Consensus was the outcome of work #1 NURSING PUBLICATION IN SOUTH CAROLINA RIGHT NOW! nurses IS READ BY MORE NO OTHER MAGAZINE OR NEWSPAPER THAN THE ONE YOU ARE HOLDING KENTUCKY CALL OR EMAIL Steve McPherson at 800-561-4686 smcpherson@pcipublishing.com Michele Forinash at 800-561-4686 mforinash@pcipublishing.com KB NursingCONNECTION 11 conducted by the APRN Joint Dialogue Group made up of rep- resentatives from the Advanced Practice Nursing Consensus Work Group and the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) APRN committee. Former KBN board member and dean of the school of nursing at Murray State University Marcia Hobbs served on the APRN committee from 2005 -2007 and contributed to the develop- ment of the model. Within the model, four roles of advanced nursing practice are recognized: certified nurse midwife (CNM), certified nurse practitioner (CNP), clinical nurse specialist (CNS), and certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA). These core roles are given the title of advanced prac- tice registered nurse (APRN). The model came about because of a lack of uniform regulation of APRNs across the states. Currently, each state determines the scope of practice, educa- tion, and the certification accepted for entry into practice. continued on next page>>

Defining the Future of Advanced Practice Nursing: The APRN Consensus Model

Suzette Scheuermann

Exciting new regulations for ARNP practice and education are being implemented in Kentucky. In December of 2008, the Kentucky Board of Nursing approved the recommendations to pursue legislation for implementation of the Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) Model Consensus. This national model that is endorsed by more than 40 regulatory, certifying, professional and accrediting agencies establishes uniform recommendations for licensure, accreditation, certification, and education of APRNs. An overview of the Consensus Model appears below: ARNP Title Change to APRN Legislation to implement the Consensus Model for APRN Regulation: Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, and Education by the Kentucky Board of Nursing is underway.<br /> <br /> One of the first changes pursued by the KBN will be to revise the title of the Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner (ARNP) to Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN). This title will be legally protected and used only by individuals licensed as an APRN.<br /> <br /> Overview of the APRN Model The APRN Model Consensus was the outcome of work conducted by the APRN Joint Dialogue Group made up of representatives from the Advanced Practice Nursing Consensus Work Group and the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) APRN committee.<br /> <br /> Former KBN board member and dean of the school of nursing at Murray State University Marcia Hobbs served on the APRN committee from 2005 -2007 and contributed to the development of the model. Within the model, four roles of advanced nursing practice are recognized: certified nurse midwife (CNM), certified nurse practitioner (CNP), clinical nurse specialist (CNS), and certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA). These core roles are given the title of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN). The model came about because of a lack of uniform regulation of APRNs across the states.<br /> <br /> Currently, each state determines the scope of practice, education, and the certification accepted for entry into practice.<br /> <br /> Licensure Once implemented, APRNs will receive a license to practice instead of registration that is currently the procedure in Kentucky. Where state law provides, the model recommends that the boards of nursing license APRNs as independent practitioners with no regulatory requirements for collaboration, direction, or supervision.<br /> <br /> Accreditation APRN education must be formal education with a graduate degree (master’s, doctorate) or post graduate certificate that is awarded by an academic institution accredited by a nursing accrediting organization recognized by the US Department of Education and/or the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. These include the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC), Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs (COA), Division of Accreditation of the American College of Nurse-Midwives, and the National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women’s Health Council on Accreditation. As part of the accreditation process, all APRN educational programs will undergo pre-approval and accreditation prior to admitting students.<br /> <br /> Monitoring of nursing accreditation and re-accreditation will be conducted by the Kentucky Board of Nursing as part of the regulatory process.<br /> <br /> Education All APRNs will be educated in one of the above four roles (APRN-CNM, APRN-CNP, APRN-CNS, APRN-CRNA) with a Focused in at least one of six populations:<br /> <br /> • adult-gerontology • pediatrics<br /> <br /> • neonatology • women’s health/gender-related<br /> <br /> • individual across the lifespan/family<br /> <br /> • psychiatric/mental health.<br /> <br /> Illustration 1: APRN Regulatory Model Reprinted with permission from the National Council for State Boards of Nursing APRN educational programs must ensure that clinical and didactic course work is comprehensive and sufficient to prepare the APRN graduate to practice in the role and population Focused.<br /> <br /> Certification Essential to recognition of the APRN role is that educational standards and practice competencies exist that are nationally recognized by the profession and accredited by the American Board of Nursing Specialties or the National Commission for Certifying Agencies. The national certifying organizations currently recognized by Kentucky Board of Nursing include American Nurses Credentialing Center; American College of Nurse Midwives, ACNM Certification Council, Council on Certification/Recertification of Nurse Anesthetists, Pediatric Nursing Certification Board, National Certification Corporation, American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Certification Association; and Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation.<br /> <br /> According to the model, certifying agencies must establish psychometrically sound testing supported by legally defensible standards for APRN examination. <br /> <br /> Specialty Certification APRNs may pursue a specialty concurrent with or in addition to the APRN education, but that specialty cannot replace the educational preparation and role delineation associated with the core role and population focused. Educational programs may offer students a concurrent specialty to their APRN education provided that the program meets all of the other requirements for APRN education, including core role and population Focused competencies. Specialty certification is encouraged by APRNs to address the emerging healthcare needs of the public, especially since it provides additional knowledge and expertise in a discrete area of practice.<br /> <br /> However, the Kentucky Board of Nursing will only assess and monitor the status of the basic certification Specialty certification and standards will be monitored by the professional specialty organizations.<br /> <br /> Non-Clinical Graduate Nursing Roles As noted in the illustration, only the APRN roles of certi- Fied registered nurse anesthetist, certified nurse practitioner, certified nurse midwife, or clinical nurse specialist will be licensed by the Kentucky Board of Nursing.<br /> <br /> Graduate nursing roles that do not Focused on direct patient care, are not APRNs and are not the Focused of this new regulatory model.<br /> <br /> Implementation of the APRN model It is recognized that current regulation of APRNs in Kentucky does not include all of the components of the model and that changes in our regulations will evolve.<br /> <br /> Once the model has been enacted by law or regulation, all new graduates applying for APRN licensure and programs providing APRN education must meet the requirements as promulgated. In the event of conflict, a provision (grandfathering clause) will exist for exemption of those already practicing in this state to continue, but if an APRN applies for licensure by endorsement from another state, the APRN would only be eligible to practice if they meet the model’s criteria as outlined.<br /> <br /> The Kentucky Board of Nursing is committed to enacting the Consensus model to facilitate consistency in the education, certification, and licensure of the APRN role. The goal of the model is to establish standards that protect the public, improve access to safe, quality APRN care and improve practice mobility for APRNs. KBN plans an incremental implementation of the APRN model with participation by APRN educators, employers, and the APRN community. As health care evolves and new standards emerge, the APRN regulatory model will allow APRNs to care for patients in a safe environment to the full potential of their nursing knowledge and skill.<br /> <br /> Information regarding these upcoming changes, as well as contact information to ask additional questions are available at the KBN website (http://kbn.ky.gov/practice/aprn_model.htm).

Bluegrass Oakwood, Inc.

 
Loading