Quest Spring2010 : Page 1

T Quest he subject of prostate cancer screening continues to draw media attention. Dr. Catalona believes the news coverage is confusing men who are Quest he he subject of prostate cancer screening continues to draw media attention. Dr. Catalona believes the news coverage is confusing men who are making decisions about PSA screening and early detection for prostate cancer. His concern is that men whose lives could be saved by early diagnosis and treatment will now find false justification for not screening. We are devoting a portion of this issue to present the rationale and the data for the life-saving benefits of PSA screening, early detection and early treatment for prostate cancer. B est he subject of prostate cancer screening continues to draw media a he subject of prostate cancer screening continues to draw media attention. Dr. Catalona believes the news coverage is confusing men who are making decisions about PSA screening and early detection for prostate cancer. His concern is that men whose lives could be saved by early diagnosis and treatment will now find false justification for not screening. We are devoting a portion of this issue to present the rationale and the data for the life-saving benefits of PSA screening, early detection and early treatment for prostate cancer. B William William J. Catalona, MD (see pages 2-3) efore the PSA era, 42% of patients had cancer that had spread beyond the prostate at diagnosis, and 18% of those patients had the most advanced stage of cancer. By 2006, with PSA screening, the rate of advanced cancer had decreased by 78%, and 91% of new cases were contained in the prostate with only 4% being advanced. Cancer Deaths by 40% Project Zero T B from: PSA Test Reduces Prostate (see page 7) he PSA test, the most prevalent method in use today for prostate cancer, has saved thousands of lives. The PSA test and advances in treatment have led to a 40 percent reduction in prostate cancer deaths since the mid- 1990s, according to the National Cancer Institute. from: PSA Cancer Screening, Much Like A Set Belt, Is A Wise Choice For Men By Patrick Walsh, MD (see page 8) ecause of the ability to diagnose cancer at a curable stage, coupled with improvements in both surgery and radiation therapy, deaths from prostate cancer in the United States have fallen 40 percent in the past 10 years, a decline that is greater than for any other cancer in men or women. from: Ignorance Is Bliss When It Comes to Prostate Cancer By Rick Lyke C The genetics of prostate cancer is a puzzle being worked on but until it’s solved, or at least further along, the PSA test – and its complementary information – is the best way to have early detection of prostate cancer and life-saving cure. (see page 9) iting difficulties in determining who should be treated when cancer is found, the American Cancer Society (ACS) has decided it is better for some men to die from prostate can- cer than for others to have their anxiety levels go up because they receive an inflated prostate specific antigen (PSA) test result due to prostatitis or some other medical condition. so In This Issue: ports on Dr. Catalona’s and his research collaborators’ latest etic studies. (see pages 6 and 12)

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