Quest Winter 2014 : Page 3

Aspirin May Lower the Risk of Prostate Cancer A new study found that the use of aspirin and/or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. support the hypothesis that anti-inflammatory drugs may have a biological role in arresting prostate cancer development, but this requires formal prospective testing in randomized trials. In the meantime, men should discuss with their doctors the benefits and risks of taking these medicines to potentially lower prostate cancer risk.” The men in the study were part of the REDUCE trial, sponsored by GlaxoSmithKline. The trial was designed to test whether dutasteride, a drug for enlarged prostate, reduced the risk of prostate cancer. to cancer cells to prevent metastatis. A recent study at Vanderbilt University found that aspirin also inhibited production of the enzyme COX-2, which reduced levels of prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ). PGE 2 is a hormone that spurs cancer metastasis. Research from these studies was presented at the 13th Annual American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research. R esearchers followed 6,390 men who had a PSA of 2.5-10 ng/mL and a negative biopsy result at the start of the study. Half of the men in the study took aspirin and/or another NSAID. The other half of the men did not take these drugs. After 4 years, researchers found that men who took aspirin and/or NSAIDs had a 13% lower risk of developing prostate cancer. These men also had a 17% lower risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer. The researchers did not have data on dose or frequency, which is a limitation of the study. Study author Adriana Vidal, PhD, of Duke University said, “Our data How Does Aspirin Reduce Cancer Mortality? Previous studies have suggested that taking aspirin or other NSAIDs—even at a low dose—could reduce the incidences of cancer death and metastasis. These drugs block the enzyme COX-1, which is commonly found in platelets. Blocking COX-1 inhibits the adherence of platelets Oliver Haberl, son of Q UEST editor Betsy Haberl and Jim Haberl, on Halloween. Obesity and Prostate Cancer Today’s research will impact the next generation. O besity is increasingly common in the U.S. It is associated with hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease and worse survival rates for many cancers. Obesity Increases the Risk of High-Grade Prostate Cancer New research led by Adriana Vidal, PhD, supports the hypothesis that obesity is associated with aggressive prostate cancer. Study participants included 6,729 men. Overall, 27% of men in the study were normal weight (BMI <25), 53% were overweight (BMI 25-29.9) and 20% were obese (BMI ≥ 30). Obesity was associated Contact Information for Dr. Catalona Office Number: 312-695-4471 with lower risk of low-grade prostate cancer. However, in multivariable analysis, obesity was associated with increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer (odds radio of 1.28). Researchers used data from the REDUCE trial. The study was published online in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention . Obesity and Long-Term Survival after Radical Prostatectomy A retrospective cohort study assessed the impact of obesity on long-term survival in men who underwent radical prostatectomy. The study included 11,152 men who had radical prostatectomies. Of this group, 27.6% of men had normal weight (BMI<25), 56% were overweight (BMI 25-29), 14.1% had mild obesity (BMI 30-34), and 2.3% had moderate/severe obesity (BMI ≥ 35). During long-term follow-up, researchers found that obese men were more likely to have biochemical recurrence than normal weight men. Biochemical recurrence-free survival was 76% for men with normal weight, compared to 65% for men with mild obesity and 51% for men with moderate/severe obesity. The study did not find that BMI was consistently associated with prostate cancer specific survival after radical prostatectomy. However, the authors noted that obese men have worse overall survival, and thus may die of other causes before prostate cancer death. The study was published in The Journal of Urology. Q UEST Winter 2014 3

Obesity and Prostate Cancer

Obesity is increasingly common in the U.S. It is associated with hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease and worse survival rates for many cancers.

Obesity Increases the Risk of High-Grade Prostate Cancer
New research led by Adriana Vidal, PhD, supports the hypothesis that obesity is associated with aggressive prostate cancer.

Study participants included 6,729 men. Overall, 27% of men in the study were normal weight (BMI <25), 53% were overweight (BMI 25-29.9) and 20% were obese (BMI =30). Obesity was associated with lower risk of low-grade prostate cancer. However, in multivariable analysis, obesity was associated with increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer (odds radio of 1.28).

Researchers used data from the REDUCE trial. The study was published online in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Obesity and Long-Term Survival after Radical Prostatectomy
A retrospective cohort study assessed the impact of obesity on long-term survival in men who underwent radical prostatectomy.

The study included 11,152 men who had radical prostatectomies. Of this group, 27.6% of men had normal weight (BMI<25), 56% were overweight (BMI 25- 29), 14.1% had mild obesity (BMI 30-34), and 2.3% had moderate/severe obesity (BMI =35).

During long-term follow-up, researchers found that obese men were more likely to have biochemical recurrence than normal weight men. Biochemical recurrence-free survival was 76% for men with normal weight, compared to 65% for men with mild obesity and 51% for men with moderate/severe obesity.

The study did not find that BMI was consistently associated with prostate cancer specific survival after radical prostatectomy. However, the authors noted that obese men have worse overall survival, and thus may die of other causes before prostate cancer death.

The study was published in The Journal of Urology.

Read the full article at http://epubs.democratprinting.com/article/Obesity+and+Prostate+Cancer/1864127/234739/article.html.

Aspirin May Lower the Risk of Prostate Cancer

A new study found that the use of aspirin and/or other nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer.

Researchers followed 6,390 men who had a PSA of 2.5-10 ng/mL and a negative biopsy result at the start of the study. Half of the men in the study took aspirin and/or another NSAID. The other half of the men did not take these drugs.

After 4 years, researchers found that men who took aspirin and/or NSAIDs had a 13% lower risk of developing prostate cancer. These men also had a 17% lower risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer.

The researchers did not have data on dose or frequency, which is a limitation of the study. Study author Adriana Vidal, PhD, of Duke University said, “Our data support the hypothesis that anti inflammatory drugs may have a biological role in arresting prostate cancer development, but this requires formal prospective testing in randomized trials. In the meantime, men should discuss with their doctors the benefits and risks of taking these medicines to potentially lower prostate cancer risk.”

The men in the study were part of the REDUCE trial, sponsored by GlaxoSmithKline. The trial was designed to test whether dutasteride, a drug for enlarged prostate, reduced the risk of prostate cancer.

How Does Aspirin Reduce Cancer Mortality?
Previous studies have suggested that taking aspirin or other NSAIDs—even at a low dose—could reduce the incidences of cancer death and metastasis. These drugs block the enzyme COX-1, which is commonly found in platelets. Blocking COX-1 inhibits the adherence of platelets to cancer cells to prevent metastatis. A recent study at Vanderbilt University found that aspirin also inhibited production of the enzyme COX-2, which reduced levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). PGE2 is a hormone that spurs cancer metastasis.

Research from these studies was presented at the 13th Annual American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research.

Read the full article at http://epubs.democratprinting.com/article/Aspirin+May+Lower+the+Risk+of+Prostate+Cancer/1864128/234739/article.html.

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